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Ukrainian literature

Since 1991, the dogmatic schemes of the Ukrainian literature development within precisely determined ideological limits of the Socialist realism, valid until that time, have ceised to be in force and been replaced by an intensive search for new aesthetic methods of reality displaying, genre forms, appearance of various literary tendencies. All that has been taking place within complicated political and social contexts of the post-collonial syndrome and its overcoming, rise of freedom of the author's individuality, becoming aware of the author's "self" as a part of the Ukrainian nation and its newborn culture. Among the most significant features of the current literary processes in Ukraine, the change of a long-term civilization and cultural orientation , resulting in the decrease of an until-very-recently strong influence of Russian literature plays a very important role, while the Western literatures continue to be in the spotlight of the readers´ attention. New type of a reader is present – he is no longer satisfied with the Socialist-realism stylistics, nor with a narrow national, folk focus, while the influence of internet technologies on the literary processes is constantly growing.

The most noticeable tendencies in the contemporary Ukrainian literature include the return to large prosaic forms, departure from the extreme postmodernism and a significant decentralization of the ongoing processes within culture and literature. An especially positive tendency to be mentioned is a return to the long-term taboo topics, search for new language and stylistic methods, expansion of new genres and a deep, broad reflection of the contemporary social issues and the historical memory. What is noticeable in the today´s complicated situation is a constantly growing political (mostly pro-Western and democratic) engagement of the majority of Ukrainian writers.



Taras Prokhasko (1968) Maria Matios (1959) Yury Andrukhovych (1960) Lina Kostenko (1930) Serhiy Zhadan (1974)














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